In our 10653NAT Diploma of Positive Psychology and Wellbeing we always talk about the ripple effect; starting with self and creating a ripple out there in the world – whatever that may mean for each person. 

In this Student Insights interview, one of our 10653NAT Diploma of Positive Psychology and Wellbeing graduates shares her completely life-changing experience of the course, and how it set her up to instil positive change in her roles as a mother, wife, daughter, and friend!

 

Anna Webb

Facilitator, Anna Webb Consulting

What drew you to complete the Diploma of Positive Psychology and Wellbeing?

I attended the Happiness and its Causes (HIC) conference a few years ago and spoke with few people at the Langley Group stand over the two days I was there. I was impressed with the calibre of the programme and had heard great things about Langley Group.

Several colleagues/friends and I had discussed doing additional study and after some research decided that the brand of Langley Group Institute (LGI), the content of material covered and the fact that it had a practical application to life was going to be beneficial.

 

What was your experience during the Diploma of Positive Psychology and Wellbeing? 

I LOVED the six days and didn’t want them to finish! They met all of my expectations and I was delighted to have chosen to do the Diploma of Positive Psychology and Wellbeing (DPP).

I enjoyed many aspects to the DPP.  The other people attending were interesting and we had insightful discussions. The programme had been well designed and I was impressed with the balance of theory and practical activities.

The space and environment in which it was held at Cliftons created a colourful, interesting and nurturing space in which to learn, be curious and absorb the information and the energy.

I enjoyed completing the assignments as they enabled me to reflect on what I had implemented into my life and how much there still was (and is) to learn.

The most rewarding part was the practical application of positive psychology (PP) principles into my life after the programme had completed.

 

How are you spreading your positive ripples, and how has the Diploma of Positive Psychology and Wellbeing helped you achieve this?

I immediately put many small practices into my daily/weekly routine.

I continued my habit of practising gratitude although I started the ritual of every family member sharing one thing for which they were grateful for at the end of each day. My three children now have a better understanding of gratitude and what this means.

I decided to implement the random act of kindness (RAK) and practice five of them every Wednesday for three months.

I bought the RAK cards and enjoyed the ripple effect when I performed a RAK for somebody, whether that was a stranger or a close friend. Seeing a stranger’s face light up when I bought them a coffee, the warmth and real emotion stayed with me for the rest of the day.

Sharing Amy Cuddy’s finding with friends and sharing her TED talk has enabled me to share the simple and practical exercise which has helped many friends and clients ensure they are at their best when public speaking.

The positive coaching elective had really changed the way in which I now coach my clients. Robert Biswas Deiner’s work (simple but effective) has definitely had a ripple effect as it changed the way in which I coached a leader and they, in turn, coached and supported and led their teams. I have seen the positive impact this has made in people that I haven’t actually directly contacted which is magnificent!

On a recent holiday to Canada, my brother was asking what had been the significant changes for me since completing the DPP.

As I began to talk, my husband Alex said he would like to share what he has observed the changes are for me. This was a profound experience for me as it was reaffirming to hear and see this from his perspective. He described the changes I had made as mother, wife, daughter and friend.

Understanding the emotions intensity chart was a light bulb moment for me. I realised that when one of my boys is in a slightly negative and low-intensity mood my initial strategy had always been to try and ‘lift’ him to be upbeat and positive. Having the realisation that this would have been very frustrating for him and that I could only do this after he had been through neutral was hugely beneficial for me.

Being aware of my vagal tone and the powerful and positive impact this has on my physical and mental health. I make the time to meditate, either formally or more informally on most days.

I have sent a photo of myself with a ‘Kindness Card’ which I often use when I perform a RAK.

I love the energy and positive emotions I experience when I do this and I enjoy seeing the ripple effect this has on another human being.

—–

You can find our upcoming dates for the next Virtual Diploma of Positive Psychology and Wellbeing here.

Watch the below video to hear more students share what makes the 10653NAT Diploma of Positive Psychology and Wellbeing a unique and life-changing course. You can also learn more about the course by downloading the course guide here.